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This Week's Titles:
Pigeon Pea Feeding Studies For Beef Cattle Go to it
Eggs Safe From Asian Bird Flu Go to it
Organizing West Central Georgia Horse Club Go to it
Reducing Pollution From Poultry Litter Runoff Go to it
Neutral Winter Weather Predicted For Georgia Go to it

 

 

Pigeon Pea Feeding Studies For Beef Cattle 1:24

College scientists are conducting feeding studies to learn more about feeding pigeon peas to beef cattle.

The research involved creep feeding to learn how cattle would react when eating pigeon peas. Gary Hill, an animal scientist with the University of Georgia's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences says during the study, comparisons were made to other feed sources which involved creep feeding. "In that study, we had a controlled group that got no creep feed at all, a second group that were creep fed oats, and a third group that was pre-fed pigeon peas that had been coarsely ground." Gary Hill with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Results of the study indicate calves that were creep fed with oats had thirty-one percent higher weight gains, compared to calves that were not creep fed. However, calves that were creep fed pigeon peas had a forty-nine percent improvement in weight gain, when compared to calves not creep fed. Despite the higher rate of weight gain, there was no significant increase in body fat on the calves. John Harrell, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, reporting from Tifton.

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Eggs Safe From Asian Bird Flu 1:30

Don't let fear of Asian bird flu scramble your desire for eggs.

Asian bird flu cases continue to be restricted to Southeast Asia, and Eastern Europe. Despite no cases in the United States, some people wonder if they should stop eating eggs. Mike Lacy, a poultry scientist with the University of Georgia's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences emphasizes eggs are safe to eat in Georgia and the United States. "In addition eggs in U.S. supermarkets are washed and sanitized before being sold. The viruses that we're talking about here, the Asian bird flu virus is very fragile. Washing and sanitizing would destroy them. And again proper cooking of eggs also destroys any bacteria viruses that may be on the shell or in the eggs." Mike Lacy with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, who adds if the virus is discovered, the farm is immediately quarantined. In fact if egg laying hens catch Asian bird flu, they let producers know something is wrong, because one of the first symptoms is they stop laying eggs. John Harrell, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, reporting from Tifton.

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Organizing West Central Georgia Horse Club 1:26

A West Central Georgia county is helping young people and horses, thanks to a special project.

Despite it's rural surroundings, Meriwether County did not have organized activities for young people that wanted to work with horses. In September, 2004, several volunteers developed a plan to organize a Horse Club, for young people and 4-H'ers in Meriwether County. Celeste Garrett, a county extension agent in Meriwether County says horse club members got hands on learning about proper horse care. "One of the main things was they started going to a lot of clinics. They had clinics on cleaning horses teeth and taking care of their hoofs and shearing. Then we had some that went to horse school for the first time." That was Celeste Garrett with the University of Georgia's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, who adds members also rode horses on two trail rides in Meriwether County. The club also adopted a horse that needed a lot of care. Club members helped improve the health of the horse, and later the horse helped lift the spirits of a young person going through difficult times. John Harrell, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, reporting from Tifton.

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Reducing Pollution From Poultry Litter Runoff 1:40

College scientists are working to solve a problem that concerns the poultry industry in Georgia.

Each year, the poultry industry in Georgia generates about two million tons of broiler litter. Most of this litter is applied to grasslands as fertilizer. But there are fears runoff caused by rains and irrigation could pollute surface waters with large amounts of phosphorous from poultry litter. Since 2004, scientists with the University of Georgia's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have been conducting rainfall simulation studies, that involved aeration treatments. "By making these slits or holes in the ground by taking cores, you actually increase the infiltration. So as a result you get less volume of runoff, and also you increase the probability that the runoff will interact with the soil. When the runoff water has contact with the soil, then you have the potential to reduce the amount of phosphorous in the runoff because the soil absorbs phosphorous." That was Miguel Cabrera with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Results showed that core aeration reduced losses of inorganic phosphorous in surface runoff by sixty-two percent. These results suggest that the use of core aeration could have a significant impact on water quality, especially in the Southern Piedmont region of Central Georgia. John Harrell, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, reporting from Tifton.

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Neutral Winter Weather Predicted For Georgia 1:19

Temperatures may go on a roller coaster ride in Georgia this winter, with a lot of ups and downs.

Georgian's have experienced a warmer than normal fall in 2005, as well as dry, with very little rainfall. As winter and the end of the year approach, many people are wondering if these above normal temperatures will continue. Pam Knox the Assistant State Climatologist at the University of Georgia says the weather pattern for the state this winter should be neutral. When this happens, expect a lot of temperature changes. "We'll get more periods with Northerly winds, more periods with Southerly winds, in other words, more day to day change in the weather than we might in a year when El Nino is a factor. And that means we'll probably have some good cold outbreaks this winter but it also means we should also see some good warm days as well." Pam Knox with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. A neutral weather pattern also means rainfall should be near normal in North and Central Georgia, but the winter could be slightly drier than normal in South Georgia. John Harrell, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, reporting from Tifton.

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